Skip to main content
(574) 583.5531
Find Us at 506 S Country Lane, Monticello
Book Exam
Map
Insurance
Menu

Ptosis

Ptosis (pronounced “toe-sis”) refers to the drooping of an eyelid. It affects only the upper eyelid of one or both eyes. The droop may be barely noticeable, or the lid can descend over the entire pupil. Ptosis can occur in both children and adults, but happens most often due to aging.

Ptosis signs and symptoms

The degree of droopiness varies from one person to the next. If you think you may have ptosis, compare a recent photo of your face to one from 10 or 20 years ago to see if there is a noticeable change in the position of your upper eyelids.

Ptosis can look similar to dermatochalasis, a group of connective tissue diseases that cause skin to hang in folds. These diseases are associated with less-than-normal elastic tissue formation. Your eye doctor should be able to tell whether or not this is the cause of your drooping eyelids.

What causes ptosis?

Ptosis can be present at birth (congenital ptosis), or develop due to aging, injury or an aftereffect of cataract or other eye surgery. This condition can also be caused by a problem with the muscles that raise the eyelid, called levator muscles. Sometimes an individual’s facial anatomy causes difficulties with the levator muscles. An eye tumor, neurological disorder or systemic disease like diabetes may also cause drooping eyelids.

How is ptosis treated?

Surgery is usually the best treatment for drooping eyelids. The surgeon tightens the levator muscles to restore the eyelids to their normal position. In very severe cases involving weakened levator muscles, the surgeon attaches the eyelid under the eyebrow to allow the forehead muscles to substitute for the levator muscles in lifting the eyelid. Eyelid surgery is also known as blepharoplasty.

After surgery, the eyelids may not appear symmetrical, even though the lids are higher than before surgery. Very rarely, eyelid movement may be lost.

It is important to choose your blepharoplasty surgeon carefully, since a poorly-done surgery could result in a less than desirable appearance or in dry eyes caused by your lids not being able to close properly after surgery. Before agreeing to ptosis surgery, ask how many procedures your surgeon has done. Also ask to see before-and-after photos of previous patients, and ask if you can talk to any of them about their experience.

Ptosis in children

Children born with moderate or severe ptosis require treatment in order for proper vision to develop. Failure to treat ptosis can result in amblyopia (diminished vision in one eye) and a lifetime of poor vision. All children with ptosis, even mild cases, should visit their eyecare practitioner every year so the doctor can monitor lid positioning and potential vision problems caused by congenital ptosis.

 

Welcome to Lakeview Optometry!

To our valued patients, we are open to routine and medical eye care by appointment only. We have strict protocols in place due to COVID-19. Patients are required to enter the office alone (minors can have one adult accompany them). Anyone entering our office is required to wear a mask and will go through a COVID-19 screening that includes a temperature check.

When you arrive at the office for an appointment or curbside dispense, please call us at (574) 583-5531 and remain in your vehicle until instructed otherwise.

If you would like to schedule an appointment for an eye exam, urgent visit, glasses purchase or adjustment please call or text our office at (574) 583-5531.

Contact lenses orders can be taken over the phone and picked up curbside or be shipped directly to your home.

We are working diligently and following the CDC and Indiana Optometric Association guidelines to protect our patients and staff. We appreciate your cooperation and support.

Thank you,

Lakeview Optometry